Shoosmiths reveals expansion plans for trainee solicitor programme

Shoosmiths is expanding its trainee solicitor programme with an increase in trainee and NQ recruits, expansion into the London office, and two trainee intakes annually.

  • Last updated Apr 18, 2019 3:38:48 PM
  • Article provided by Shoosmiths
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Shoosmiths’ previous trainee solicitor programme invited 22 graduates to join the firm each year for a two-year programme. From September 2019, the firm will increase its trainee numbers to 30 annually, and will now also include London as a base office location. 

Along with the increased number of recruits, the programme will include a March intake, as well as the usual September intake commencing from March 2020. Shoosmiths will see 24 trainees on the September 2019 intake and six trainees on the March 2020 intake – moving to a 20/10 split in the next few years. 

Trainees working in London can expect to earn £38,000-£39,000, with this rising to £65,000 upon qualification. In regional locations, trainee salaries are £27,000-28,000, rising to £42,500 for NQs, and those training in Scotland earn £25,000 - £26,000, rising to £40,000 upon qualification. 

Samantha Hope, Shoosmiths’ graduate recruitment manager, said: “To ensure Shoosmiths is moving in the right direction, every three years we take a fresh look at our firm-wide strategy. With this comes a renewed focus on the number of trainees we recruit per year as we plan ahead for the introduction of the Solicitors Qualifying Exam (SQE), and we are pleased to confirm this will include London as part of the ambitious growth strategy for that office.”

This will mean nearly 30 additional vacancies being recruited to from this year’s application/assessment centres, to fill the extra vacancies for 2019 and 2020, as well as 2021. Shoosmiths offices across the country will be recruiting trainees, with opportunities in Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, London, Manchester, Milton Keynes, Nottingham, Reading and Solent. 

Shoosmiths has also announced that nine trainees qualified in March 2019, and all nine were offered and accepted an NQ position with the firm, giving the firm 100% retention rate for its first ever Spring recruitment round. Seven trainees qualified into the corporate division, one into real estate and one into business advisory.

Stephen Porter, national head of corporate, said:  “Significant growth has been earmarked across all corporate specialisms at Shoosmiths, and our recent number of NQ recruits this spring shows that talent retention is a key driver for growth in the firm and will support a major recruitment drive across all areas.” The online application form is open until 31 May 2019. you can find it here.

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