Leading law organisations comment on Brexit

With the fallout from the British referendum to leave the EU in full flow, both the Bar Council and the Young Barristers Committee have given their thoughts on the matter, and how it will affect the legal profession. 

  • Last updated Aug 12, 2019 4:29:25 PM
  • By Jack J Collins, Editor, AllAboutLaw.co.uk
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Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Chairman of the Bar, Chantal-Aimée Doerries QC stated that: “The Bar of England and Wales is ready to assist in an achieving an orderly restructuring of the UK’s relationship with the EU in the coming months and beyond.

"The long-term effect of Brexit on the legal services sector’s contribution to the UK economy will depend significantly on the nature and terms of the post-Brexit relationship with the EU. Despite all the turbulence, however, I am confident that London will remain a leading centre for international dispute resolution.

"The reputation of barristers and our judiciary overseas, beyond the EU, is very high and I expect it will remain so in the years to come. We shall continue to work closely with our partners in European Bar Associations. ”

Chairman of the Young Barristers’ Committee, Louisa Nye said: “I am currently attending the European Young Bar Association’s AGM in Dusseldorf, and this reflects the Young Bar’s commitment to maintaining a good working relationship with the European market.

"The Young Bar is committed to engaging with other European lawyers regarding the changes that will be taking place. The Young Barristers’ Committee is confident that the quality of advocacy and legal service provision in the jurisdiction will not be undermined by today’s results, and London will remain a leading centre for international dispute resolution.”

Both Chairmen appear confident in the fact that London will remain a world leading market in the dispute resolution sector, and it is interesting to note that both are working with EU counterparts in order to enact a good deal for the capital in regards to negotiations about the new EU deal. 

Whether that can be achieved or not, and the limitations to the British relationship with the EU, remains to be seen; but the confident attitude of both Doerries and Nye suggests that there is still a bright future for the Bar in the United Kingdom.

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