University of Bristol Law School

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“Virtually every aspect of human experience is to some degree filtered through law. Studying law at the University of Bristol means opening up a vast array of exciting careers, from corporate law to human rights—and we’re there to support you by helping you develop all the skills you need,” Professor Joanne Conaghan, Head of School.

Why Bristol?

The University of Bristol is ranked among the top five UK institutions for research excellence*. Studying here means studying at a Law School that has a long and rich heritage as being one of the best in the UK, most recently listed as one of the top 10 Law Schools in the country in the 2016 Times / Sunday Times Good University Guide. 

Based in the iconic Wills Memorial Building, at the heart of Bristol, you will be challenged, inspired and empowered by an intellectually distinguished cadre of legal scholars at the forefront of their research fields. With access to the very latest legal thinking and expertise, and an academically rigorous curriculum, you will leave with a qualification that is respected around the world.

“Bristol has some of the best lecturers and researchers in the country. They’re influencing law and policy making and that’s trickling down when they’re teaching us. I feel at Bristol we’re definitely at the forefront of law when studying here,” Emily Bueno, MA Law

The courses

We have an extremely motivated and culturally diverse postgraduate community, undertaking a range of taught and research-based programmes under the guidance of the Law School’s leading academics. The University of Bristol Law School offers two main courses.

The LLM, an intense one year course that enables you to study law at an advanced level and start to develop specialist knowledge. And the MA, a fast track full-time Masters that offers non-law graduates the opportunity to study for a qualifying law degree in 21 months, rather than the standard three years.

Law is tough but Bristol Law School courses are really interesting and will allow you to go on and work in almost any industry. Employers will appreciate the academic rigour of the Law School's curriculum and studying here at Bristol is a great experience.” Sam Unsworth, law student.

Your future career

According to a recent report**, Bristol is the 5th most targeted university for graduate recruitment. The Law School’s core curriculum is richly supported by opportunities to participate in pro-bono work with initiatives such as the Bristol Law Clinic, the Human Rights Implementation Centre and Lawyers without Borders, helping build skills and empathy to deepen your learning experience.

To help you prepare for the world of legal practice, there are also a number of thriving law-focused student societies. The award-winning University of Bristol Law Club, the vibrant Bristol Bar Society and various Mooting and Debating programmes will all help you hone your legal skills outside of the classroom.

And to gain insight of life beyond university, our vibrant and committed law Alumni network offers support through a variety of initiatives including a professional mentoring scheme, numerous networking opportunities, and the Distinguished Alumni Lecture Series that sees leaders in their field of law, business, the judiciary or Parliament, sharing practical experience and analysis of very subjects you will be studying.

“Bristol University Law School is a passport. It is a calling card. If you have it on your CV you know that if it is not to open the door, it will facilitate your way in. I and my peers have all gone on to do very well indeed in the law, and without the law. Why? Because they studied here at Bristol University,” Dan Schaffer, Alumnus and Senior Partner at Herbert Smith Freehills.

* Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014)

** High Fliers Research Limited (2014)

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